Monthly Archives: August 2014

TG #23

In Issue Twenty Three:
Darwin’s Great Tree + Climbing Mt Murchison +  Tafoni on Dromedary + Redmap – Captain

Hello and best wishes!

#23 is an issue drafted on the road, being sent to you from a hotel in Kyoto, Japan.

In this issue, we’ll follow along with the Charles Darwin’s famous analogy of life as a branching tree, and change his archaic language into something more modern.

In a photo essay we’ll get into the high mountains of the Tasmanian west coast and into the magical terrain of Mount Murchison. Strange rocks and glacial carving have combined to create a spectacular peak. And it’s a fast climb you can do in a day!

We’ll continue our mild obsession with the sandstone formations known as tafoni. and we’ll continue on with another video from the Redmap competition.

We hope you enjoy reading this issue as much as we enjoyed putting it together!

– The Editor

 





Redmap – Captain’s Address

We love citizen science projects and we’re especially keen on the Redmap (Range Extension Database Map)! This is a portal and a community where you can share your sightings of fish and other marine life as they are spotted in new habitats around Australia. The project began here in Tasmania and has since expanded around the country. As our planet’s climate changes, animals are being found in new and unexpected regions. To raise awareness of their project, Redmap has recently conducted a video competition and invited filmmakers to send in a 45 second video promoting the project. Tasmanian Geographic is delighted to be able to share the award-winners with you. Congratulations to all who participated, and thank you Redmap for running the competition! – Ed

3rd Place: Captain’s Address by Angus Barton from Pokolbin, NSW

Redmap

Mount Dromedary Tafoni

Small sandstone  cave structures known as tafoni are habitat for striated pardalotes (Pardalotus striatus striatus) on the slopes of Mount Dromedary, near New Norfolk.

These birds are sometimes called “Chipwips”. You can lean more about them and listen to their “chip chip” calls at the online Birds In Backyards site.

Darwin’s Great Tree, Annotated

A cabbage palm near Maungaraho Rock, Northlands, New Zealand

A cabbage palm near Maungaraho Rock, Northlands, New Zealand

➤  In the Origin of The Species by Means of Natural Selection, Darwin wrote eloquently of the Tree of Life, using the academic English language current in 1872. But the language has evolved in the last 140 years. (more…)

TG #22

An anniversary.
In Issue Twenty Two:
Lake Judd Packrafting + Brewers’ Battle +  Redmap – Tables Turned + Quoins

Hello and best wishes!

It is an anniversary. We have reached one year of Tasmanian Geographic! Thank you for your support and involvement in what has turned out to be a most marvelous ride.

Of all the things that I enjoy about running this project, it’s that it gives me a way to branch out and learn more about the other projects, passions, and stories that inspire people on the island and abroad. So far, we’ve published about eighty stories from about fifty contributors, and produced twenty one issues bundling together their work. The idea, of course, is that bringing these different elements together creates a more interesting and engaging work.

So let’s dive on in.

In the most jagged and carved terrain of the Southwest, Nick Fitzgerald hops onto an ultralight raft and takes a paddle on Lake Judd. His photos are spectacular and bring a colour and brightness to a place that can be grey, stormy, and intimidating. Enjoy the cool waters and scenic vistas.

Andrew Wilson makes videos, captures images, and helps knit together a community of freelancers and consultants at the Hobart Waterfront. He chimes in with a photo essay on a beer-brewing competition somewhere in a Tasmanian valley. His portraits will bring in the cheer and warmth of the event; a competition where everyone wins.

We bring another one of Redmap’s videos from their recent competition- If the Tables Were Turned by Piers Luttrell. It’s quick, it’s funny, and it reminds you of what the fish experience when the citizens scientists come visiting.

And, to get cartographic, the mapmakers’ department tries to answer what surely is the most pressing question on everyone’s mind….what’s a quoin?  By the time you finish reading it….you’ll know what one is and where to find them.

As always, please enjoy! Tell your friends and we hope we’ll have another magical year.

All the best!

– The Editor





Exploring the Largest Glacial Lake of the Southwest

Amidst the mighty peaks of the Southwest:

It is not difficult to imagine the Lake Judd Glacier descending from the heights of Mount Anne during the Pleistocene, carving a sinuous trough as it went. The result is one of Tasmania’s best examples of a glacial landscape.

Lake Judd is just over three kilometres long and with a dogleg shape such that the increasingly dramatic cliffs and arêtes are gradually revealed as one paddles up the lake into the shadow of the cirque. To the west and north are five hundred metre high cliffs of ragged dolerite columns on Mount Eliza and Frances Bluff.

Native conifers including king billy pine are prominent features of the forest here, indicating a cool wet climate with long-term absence of fire. Eucalyptus forest is confined to the terminal moraine. Small beaches of quartzite sand occur in a few places, with aquatic plants in the shallows.

The only easy approach to Judd is from the south where the Anne River drains the lake, spilling over the terminal moraine of accumulated glacial material. But you can always make it more difficult by carrying an inflatable boat on a 30ºC day! It seemed like a good idea for an unusual weekend trip and so after 2.5 hours slogging though scrub and buttongrass and mud we clambered over the moraine and wasted no time cooling off in the lake.

The Battle of the Brewers

In a small little valley in the south of Tasmania, a war rages, every year. In this war however, there is not a drop of blood spilt.  The casualties are few though even still there is only winner in the end. It is a war where small and large heads abound and colour is of no obstacle– in fact, it is greatly appreciated. Welcome to the yearly battle of the home brewers. Bring your gloves, bring your glass, but don’t spill a drop.


Redmap – People’s Choice Award – If the Tables Were Turned

We love citizen science projects and we’re especially keen on the Redmap (Range Extension Database Map)! This is a portal and a community where you can share your sightings of fish and other marine life as they are spotted in new habitats around Australia. The project began here in Tasmania and has since expanded around the country. As our planet’s climate changes, animals are being found in new and unexpected regions. To raise awareness of their project, Redmap has recently conducted a video competition and invited filmmakers to send in a 45 second video promoting the project. Tasmanian Geographic is delighted to be able to share the award-winners with you. Congratulations to all who participated, and thank you Redmap for running the competition! – Ed

People’s Choice Prize: If the tables were turned by Piers Luttrell from Sydney, NSW

Redmap

What’s a Quoin?

➤ On the eastern shore of the Derwent, visible from hillsides and balconies throughout Hobart, one looks across at a strikingly asymmetrical mountain on the Eastern Shore– Gunner’s Quoin.

Its dolerite cliffs rise sheer from the lowlands, but from many angles in the city this mountain is hidden from sight. It hides behind Madman’s Hill and Mount Direction, but is actually a far more impressive mountain than either. On Gunner’s Quoin are the only dolerite cliffs of the Easter Shore. Few people seem to notice this mountain, and fewer have visited it.

What a curious name! What is a “quoin”, and where can we find one?

(more…)