Issue Eight

It’s time to get our feet wet.

In this eighth issue of Tasmanian Geographic we’ll discover some of the wonders of the liquid element.

The Australian Fur Seals are smart, fast, and very curious. We’ll dive into the salt water with scuba gear and have an encounter with these playful animals in the kelp forests of Tassie’s Northeast.

Did you know that there is a river buried underneath the capital city? If you walk across the Elizabeth Street Mall, you are actually walking on a bridge across the city’s original source of water. We’re greatly honoured to publish an innovative and award-winning design project from the University of Minnesota, in which we imagine a Hobart city centre revitalised by the daylighting of the Rivulet.

We’ll follow a geomorphologist and trekker onto the muddy trails of the far Southwest of Tassie and learn about the dangerous thoughts that wilderness can provoke. Along the way, we’re introduced to the rocks and plants of this internationally renowned region.

And to round it off, we’re testing a new technology here at Tasmanian Geographic. You can experience a photographic expedition to the Esperance River by viewing a photo sphere- once you load the page you can use your mouse or touchscreen to look in all directions. Let us know how you go!

All the best!
— The Editor

TG #8

In Issue Eight: The Seals of Tenth Island + Daylighting the Rivulet + The Far Southwest – A Subversive Land + Sphere: On the Esperance River

Editor

Sphere: On the Esperance River

Teleportal: Put on your gumboots and wade into the Esperance River in Southernmost Tasmania

Editor

The Far Southwest – A Subversive Land

What makes a wilderness dangerous?

Chris Sharples

Daylighting the Rivulet

What if Hobart’s long-forgotten waterway was brought back into social consciousness?

Tiffani Navratil

The Seals of Tenth Island

Dive underwater into the kelp forests with the the curious and playful seals of a Bass Strait island

Mark Polinski